About Steve Shields

Christ-follower, husband, dad, pastor, blogger, speaker, discipler, traveler, techie.

You’re Not Alone :: PODCAST

So, there’s this guy – we’ll call him Willis – and he has a problem. It’s between him and his wife, Wilma. They’re not getting along well.

And he doesn’t know who to talk to.

Even though he has good friends at work, he’s not telling them. He knows that, at times, his workplace seems like a gossip processing house.

Even though he has a good relationship with his pastor, he won’t talk to him. He doesn’t want to because, frankly, he’s too embarrassed.

He’s afraid to tell his family. If his parents found out, they would immediately take his side, and that would injure their relationship with his wife, Wilma.

Willis feels helpless. And he is helpless. He’s helpless because he’s believing a lie:
A lie that tells him he is alone.

This concept of feeling aloneness is pretty universal.

It’s more than just being alone. It’s more than occasional loneliness. It’s a feeling of aloneness — like you have been abandoned or you are isolated from anyone who can help you.

If you’ve never felt it… well, I don’t know what to say to someone whose never felt it. We all feel it.

This podcast speaks of aloneness, and how Christians should respond to these feelings.

Leaving Behind the Past

From a message presented at Curwensville Alliance Church on 12/31/2017

I tend to be a bit of a nostalgist. By that, I mean, I love to think about the past. There are a lot of sweet memories in my past.

And there are memories that are not so sweet. Bitter ones.

How do you leave those memories behind — the bitter ones, while retaining the sweet ones? That’s what this podcast addresses.

Thanks for listening, and as always, you’re welcome at Curwensville Alliance. There are plenty more podcasts there.

Discussion Questions on Seven Men & the Secret to Their Greatness: Wilberforce

Some questions for discussion on Eric Metaxas’ chapter on William Wilberforce.

  1. What do you think of the role William Wilberforce’s wealthy aunt and uncle played in his life? What surprises you about it?
  2. Have you ever heard someone applying the phrase, “…taking things to far…” to one’s faith? The question, “where, exactly, must one draw the line?” is common. How do you answer it?
  3. Wilberforce’s parents were concerned that he would not become the person they hoped he would become. Do you think they were disappointed?

    WHM146809 Portrait of William Wilberforce (1759-1833), 1794 (oil on canvas) by Hickel, Anton (1745-98)
    oil on canvas
    © Wilberforce House, Hull City Museums and Art Galleries, UK
    German, out of copyright

  4. From where did Wilberforce feel his mission came? How would this help him overcome obstacles? Metaxas emphasize this again and again. Why?
  5. Where you surprised to read of the social ills of the late 1700’s in London? What evils might an Eric Metaxas of 200 years from now list?
  6. Metaxas says, “At it’s core, every battle worth fighting is a spiritual battle”. Do you agree with this? Why?
  7. Why do you think that Metaxas feels the most important thing Wilberforce was able to do was to have a personal relationship with God?